CAR_Public/031002.mbx            C L A S S   A C T I O N   R E P O R T E R

          Thursday, October 2, 2003, Vol. 5, No. 195

                        Headlines

AG-CHEM EQUIPMENT: SEC Files Civil Injunctive Action in MD Court
ALABAMA: Talladega Kept Using Well Water Known To Be Polluted
ALASKA: Investigates Antitrust Rumors Around Yukon Fuel Co. Sale
ALSTOM SA: WV Investment Board To Commence Lawsuit Over Losses
FOUNTAINHEAD TITLE: Lenders Commence Fraud Suit Over Kickbacks

HOLOCAUST LITIGATION: Claimants Still Awaiting Share in $1B Fund
KENTUCKY: Parents Oppose Officials' Viewing of Deer Lodge Tapes
KING IMPORT: Recalls Thelma Mayonnaise Due to Undeclared Eggs
KO SECURITIES: SEC Asserts Securities Violations V. Firm, Trader
L90 INC.: SEC Files Civil, Criminal Complaints For Stock Fraud

MARCOS LITIGATION: Trial In Marcos Lawsuit Set For January 2004
MEDCO HEALTH: Government Launches Kickback Lawsuit
MICROSOFT CORPORATION: Lindows Stands Firm On Settlement Website
MICROSOFT CORPORATION: Reaches $10.5M Pact For Consumer Lawsuit
MUTUAL FUNDS: Four Funds In NY Attorney General Probe Face Suits

NETWORK ASSOCIATES: Reaches Agreement For Shareholders Lawsuits
NEW ZEALAND: Bishop Apologizes After Abuse Charges V. Boys' Home
OAKGRIGSBY INC.: IL Court Rules V. Ex-President in SEC Complaint
QWEST COMMUNICATIONS: SEC Settles Securities Fraud Proceeding
REMMINGTON ADVISERS: SEC Starts Proceedings For Securities Fraud

RIVERSIDE FUNERAL: ID Atty. General Lodges Customer Fraud Suit
SPORT-HALEY INC.: SEC Launches Civil Fraud Charges in CO Court
THIMEROSAL LITIGATION: Danish Study Asserts No Link To Autism
UNITED STATES: Land Bureau Faces Lawsuit Over Pact With Rancher
UNUMPROVIDENT CORPORATION: Announces New CEO Amidst Stock Suits

                 New Securities Fraud Cases

ALSTOM SA: Scott + Scott Lodges Securities Fraud Lawsuit in CT
BANK OF AMERICA: Rabin Murray Lodges Securities Suit in N.D. CA
BANK OF AMERICA: Emerson Poynter Commences Securities Suit in CA
BANK OF AMERICA: Schiffrin & Barroway Lodges NJ Securities Suit
HEALTHTRONICS SURGICAL: Brodsky & Smith Lodges Stock Suit in GA

MIDWAY GAMES: Cauley Geller Lodges Securities Lawsuit in N.D. IL
MIDWAY GAMES: Schiffrin & Barroway Lodges Stock Suit in N.D. IL
POLAROID CORPORATION: Brodsky & Smith Lodges Stock Lawsuit in NY
POLAROID CORPORATION: Shapiro Haber Lodges Securities Suit in MA
POLAROID CORPORATION: Rabin Murray Lodges Securities Suit in NY

STRONG FINANCIAL: Emerson Poynter Lodges Securities Suit in NY
VERTEX PHARMACEUTICALS: Brodsky & Smith Lodges Stock Suit in MA

                        *********

AG-CHEM EQUIPMENT: SEC Files Civil Injunctive Action in MD Court
----------------------------------------------------------------
The United States Securities and Exchange Commission filed a
civil injunctive action in the US District Court for the
District of Maryland against DeWalt J. Willard, Jr., William F.
Willard, Sr. and Larry L. Martin, for insider trading.

The complaint alleges that the three defendants traded while in
possession of material non-public information in advance of a
November 20, 2000 announcement that Ag-Chem Equipment Company,
Inc. (Ag-Chem) had been acquired by AGCO Corporation.

The complaint alleges that DeWalt Willard, a member of Ag-Chem's
board of directors, after learning of Ag-Chem's merger
negotiations, purchased Ag-Chem stock in his own account and
through the securities account of a friend, thereby earning
illegal profits of  $73,287.  The complaint alleges that DeWalt
Willard also failed to file the required Form 4 with the
Commission disclosing any of the purchases made through his
friend's account.

The complaint alleges that DeWalt Willard also tipped his son,
William Willard, about the merger negotiations.  William Willard
then tipped Mr. Martin, his friend and business associate, and
asked Mr. Martin to purchase Ag-Chem stock on his behalf.  The
complaint alleges that Mr. Martin purchased Ag-Chem stock for
William Willard's benefit, resulting in illegal profits of
$33,462 for William Willard.

Finally, the complaint alleges that, following receipt of the
tip, Mr. Martin purchased Ag-Chem stock in his personal
brokerage account and for his two sons, earning illegal profits
of $109,387.

Without admitting or denying the allegations in the Commission's
complaint, all three defendants have consented to permanent
injunctions from violations of Section 10(b) of the Securities
Exchange Act of 1940 (Exchange Act) and Rule 10b-5 thereunder.
In addition, DeWalt Willard has consented to the entry of a
permanent injunction from violations of Section 16(a) of the
Exchange Act and Rule 16a-3 thereunder, and to the entry of an
order barring him from serving as an Officer or Director of a
public company.  DeWalt Willard has also agreed to pay
disgorgement of $73,287, together with prejudgment interest of
$12,037, and to pay a civil penalty of $107,478.  William
Willard and Larry Martin have consented to pay disgorgement,
jointly and severally, of $142,849, together with prejudgment
interest of $23,463.  William Willard has also agreed to pay a
civil penalty of $33,462, and Larry Martin has agreed to pay a
civil penalty of $109,387.


ALABAMA: Talladega Kept Using Well Water Known To Be Polluted
-------------------------------------------------------------
Talladega, Alabama's city board continued selling water from one
of two contaminated wells for years even though they were known
to be polluted by potentially hazardous chemicals, according to
a story in a recent issue of The Daily Home newspaper, the
Associated Press Newswire reports.

The Daily Home reported that the city water system had shut down
both wells in 1995, when it was ordered to do so.  However, one
of the wells was reopened and used to supply citizens with
water, off and on, until this spring; namely, May 28, 2003,
according to monthly reports.  At times, the contaminant levels
in water from both wells exceeded legal limits.

Residents have filed a class action over knowingly being
supplied with water from a well known by city officials to be
contaminated.  "We should have been told what we were consuming
all these years," said Dixie Bonner, a resident who lives near
one of the wells.

The Talladega Water and Sewer Board had told customers there was
no "immediate risk" from the well that had been reopened and
then closed again this spring.   Yet the Board also sent a
notice warning of possible long-term health risks including
liver damage and an increased risk of cancer.

J.L. Chestnut, an attorney representing water customers, said
the system's actions showed "reckless indifference to the public
health.  We expect that some victims will have short-term
problems and others will have long-term difficulties," said Mr.
Chestnut.  "Time is already beginning to tell."

The Daily Home also reported that the water system has been
reluctant to release records about the wells, but documents on
file with the Alabama Department of Environmental Management
(ADEM), in Montgomery, show a history of problems.

The wells were ordered closed by ADEM after both wells recorded
high levels of tetrachloroethylene, a solvent also known as PCE,
in 1995, as indicated above.  However, also, as indicated above,
one of the wells was allowed to continue operation, off and on,
until the board closed it in May 2003.  Both wells were
documented as having PCE contamination since 1988, according to
a chemical analysis recorded by ADEM.  Other hazardous chemicals
were also recorded as present in the water obtained from the
wells.

The Talladega Water and Sewer Board is being investigated by
federal authorities, with agents from the FBI and the
Environmental Protection Agency serving search warrants last
week.


ALASKA: Investigates Antitrust Rumors Around Yukon Fuel Co. Sale
----------------------------------------------------------------
The Alaska attorney general's office is investigating antitrust
concerns raised over the sale of one of the largest fuel
distributors in Western Alaska, Associated Press Newswires
reports.  Yukon Fuel Co. and its parent company Northland
Holdings Co. are for sale, and some Western Alaska groups are
concerned that its main competitor, Crowley Maritime Service,
may purchase the company.

Crowley and a rival distributor, Delta Western, had formed a
joint venture in 1986 that eventually drew accusations of price
fixing.  In 1992, Crowley agreed to pay $1.2 million to settle a
federal class action.  The lawsuit was brought by more than
1,000 Western Alaska fuel customers.  The fear is that history
may repeat itself if Crowley purchases Yukon Fuel, thereby
setting up a scenario for a non-competitive landscape and a
possible flurry of class actions by consumer advocates.

The potential effect of Crowley's purchase is so substantial
that the state has an obligation to learn more about it, said Ed
Sniffen, assistant attorney general in the Commercial and Fair
Business Division.

Although Crowley spokesman Mark Miller would not confirm whether
the company is interested in purchasing Yukon Fuel, Meera
Kohler, executive director of the Alaska Village Electric
Cooperative, said Yukon Fuel informed her that Crowley was a
likely buyer.

Such a sale could easily drive up the price of fuel and
electricity, Ms. Kohler said.  "Without competitors, it would be
whatever the market will bear, with no alternatives," she added.

The state's Department of Law is concerned that a lack of
competition could drive the price of diesel fuel up in Western
Alaska, Mr. Sniffen said.  Armed with subpoena powers, "I'll be
asking the companies to explain to us what it is they are
proposing to do and how it might affect the competition," said
Ed Sniffen.

"Diesel (fuel) is the prime feedstock for rural Alaska," said
Eric Yould, executive director of the Alaska Power Association,
which also is investigating.  "We are not the kind of community
that you have in the Lower 48, where you can run propane or
natural gas."


ALSTOM SA: WV Investment Board To Commence Lawsuit Over Losses
--------------------------------------------------------------
The agency that invests West Virginia state funds will seek to
participate in an investment losses lawsuit against the French-
based company Alstom SA, the Dow Jones International News,
reports.

Alstom is an international power generation, transmission and
distribution company, which also constructs ships.  The Company
and its officers face a class action filed in the United States
District Court in New Haven, Connecticut.  The lawsuit alleges
that between November 1998 and June 2003, company officers
engaged in a scheme to conceal problems in Alstom's marine
segment to prevent a decline in the price of its securities.

West Virginia held stock in the company during the class period,
and lost $1.6 million.  The West Virginia Investment Management
Board's investment committee voted recently to pursue the case
and filed for damages, thereby joining up with the State
Universities Retirement Systems of Illinois and the
International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers in the class
action against Alstom.


FOUNTAINHEAD TITLE: Lenders Commence Fraud Suit Over Kickbacks
--------------------------------------------------------------
Fountainhead Title Group faces a class action in the United
States District Court in Baltimore, Maryland, charging that the
Company, Premier Financial Co., and PFC Title LLC set up a fake
company that funneled kickbacks to Premier in exchange for
Premier's business, the Baltimore Business Journal reports.

Plaintiffs Beverly E. Phipps and Brenna and John L. Wolfe, filed
the suit, which alleges that some borrowers who worked with the
Company paid between $400 and $1,000 in fees to the sham
company.  The suit mentioned firms Amerix Mortgage Corporation
and Title Processing Center LLC who allegedly agreed to pay
$870,000 and Millennium Title & Escrow LLC who paid $100,000 to
settle charges that they each set up a sham company to collect
illegal referral fees paid by Millennium to Amerix, court
records show.

Specifically, the suit states that Fountainhead and Premier set
up a company called PFC Title LLC, or Dove Title, which appeared
on documents for loans originated by Premier and closed by
Fountainhead.  PFC allegedly charged borrowers a fee of $400 to
$1,000 for each loan settlement, but performed "little or no
work."  The lawsuit alleges that Fountainhead has similar
arrangements with other mortgage brokers besides Premier, the
Business Journal reports.

The plaintiffs are represented by attorneys Richard S. Gordon
and Kieron F. Quinn from Towson firm Quinn Gordon and Wolf LLP
and Denis J. Murphy of Civil Justice Inc, which won settlements
in class actions alleging that other title companies and
mortgage lenders developed sham companies to funnel kickbacks.

Fountainhead will defend itself against the suit, the company's
Maryland division president, William L. Yerman told the Business
Journal.  "We absolutely spend our day priding ourselves on
being a professional company and doing the right thing," he
said.  "We're going to make sure that the truth comes out."

Through attorney Brian L. Moffet of Gordon, Feinblatt, Rothman,
Hoffberger & Hollander LLC, Premier Financial said it had no
comment on the case.


HOLOCAUST LITIGATION: Claimants Still Awaiting Share in $1B Fund
----------------------------------------------------------------
Over 5 years have passed since a global accord was made between
Jewish plaintiff groups and Swiss banks Credit Suisse and UBS,
that placed $1.2 billion into a fund intended for survivors of
the Holocaust, but since then only 999 claimants have been paid,
out of a total of 33,000, SwissInfo.com reports.

Some $800 million of the fund is intended for the owners of
dormant Holocaust-era accounts and their heirs.  The remaining
$425 million is designated for slave laborers, refugees turned
away at the Swiss border when trying to escape Nazi Germany, and
for Holocaust survivors now living in poverty.

As of July this year, however, only $125.9 million has been paid
out, according to the Zurich-based Claims Resolution Tribunal
(CRT).  Back in 1998, when the fund was drawn up, speedy
restitution was seen as a principal concern due to the advanced
age of many Holocaust survivors.  In June last year, Paul
Volcker, one of the heads of the CRT, said the system of handing
out the money needed to be simplified.  The claims process, he
added, was too cumbersome.

Meanwhile, lawyers responsible for overseeing the payments say
the sum of $800 million for dormant account claimants is too
high.  They say a total amount of between $300 and $400 million
would suffice.  This has led to disagreements over how the
remainder of the $800 million should be spent.

Those close to IsraČl Singer, the former secretary general of
the World Jewish Congress, would like to see the funds spent on
Jewish cultural projects.  A view endorsed by Lucerne historian
Thomas Maissen, who says there are not enough legitimate
claimants to account for the money.  However, numerous small
organizations representing Holocaust victims insist the money
should go directly to either the survivors or those eligible for
inheritance.

Burt Neuborne, the senior lawyer representing claimants, and
Judah Gribetz, the lawyer responsible for overseeing how the
money is spent, are due to announce shortly the date for a
meeting of interested parties.

According to, recently published, findings of a 5-year probe
into Switzerland's wartime past, major failings were uncovered
regarding its policies during the Nazi era.  The Independent
Commission of Experts, headed by Jean-Franáois Bergier,
highlighted three particular areas: treatment of refugees,
cooperation with the Nazi regime and restitution.

According to the Commission, 24,000 refugees - mainly Jews -
were turned away by border guards during the Second World War.
The ICE also found that business and financial institutions did
little to help victims of the Nazis regain possession of their
assets.

An investigation by the CRT's Paul Volcker in 1999 found more
than 50,000 dormant accounts possibly belonging to Holocaust
victims in Swiss banks.

In re Holocaust Victim Assets Litigation, case number CV-96-4849
was initiated in October 1996 in the U.S. District Court of the
Eastern District of New York before Judge Edward R. Korman.  It
consists of four separate amended and consolidated class
actions: Sonabend et al. v. Union Bank of Switzerland et al.,
Trilling-Grotch et al. v. Union Bank of Switzerland et al.,
Weisshaus et al. v. Union Bank of Switzerland et al. and World
Council of Orthodox Jewish Communities Inc. et al. v. Union Bank
of Switzerland et al.  The settlement approval order was
released on July 26, 2000.  Claimants are represented by senior
counsel Burt Neuborne for the settlement class.


KENTUCKY: Parents Oppose Officials' Viewing of Deer Lodge Tapes
---------------------------------------------------------------
Parents of high school girls who were caught partially naked on
cameras hidden in walls and ceilings at Powell County High
School protested screenings of the tapes by school officials,
the Montana Forum reports.

Three Powell County high schoolers - Eddy Newman, Matthew Thomas
and Benjamin Frankforter - were caught surreptitiously viewing
and videotaping female athletes in basketball and volleyball
contests at the school, while they changed in the school's
locker room.  The three were convicted last December of burglary
charges, and were expelled from the school.  Parents of the
girls caught on tape later filed a class action against the
instigators and school officials.

The purpose of the viewings was to identify which schools were
actually filmed.  Powell County Attorney Chris Miller told the
Montana Forum that unnamed representatives from various high
schools have been viewing portions of the tapes for
identification purposes since May, in compliance with a court
order issued by District Judge Ted Mizner.  The representatives
must be selected by school superintendents, he said.

Julie Meyer of Troy, whose daughter may be on the videotapes,
told the Forum that the victims and parents - not school
superintendents - should decide who identifies the girls.
"That's totally wrong," Ms. Meyer said hours after she found out
about the viewing arrangement.  "I'm upset about that.  That's
up to the parents and the girls it happened to.  We should have
been informed."

Mr. Miller said the process to identify victims began in May
then stopped after lawyers in the class action challenged the
order.  It resumed again in September, after the state supreme
court upheld Judge Mizner's directive.  He wouldn't say how many
schools have already sent representatives, some of whom are
school employees and some are not.

However, he said that all representatives were subject to
criminal background checks and an effort was made to determine
if they were related to any victims.  Their names will be
withheld and the reports they file with Judge Mizner will be
sealed.


KING IMPORT: Recalls Thelma Mayonnaise Due to Undeclared Eggs
-------------------------------------------------------------
New York State Agriculture Commissioner Nathan L. Rudgers issued
an alert to consumers, who are sensitive to eggs, to not consume
"Thelma Mayonnaise" distributed by King Import, Inc., 98 12th
Street, Brooklyn, New York 11215 due to the presence of
undeclared eggs.  People who have allergies to eggs run the risk
of serious or life threatening allergic reactions if they
consume these products.

"Thelma Mayonnaise" is packaged in a 500-gram plastic jar with a
plastic cap.  The numbers 09/06/03 07:39 above 06/11/03 are
printed on the side of the container.  All writing is in Hebrew.
The problem was discovered by New York State food inspectors
during a routine inspection of a retail store in Brooklyn.  The
product was sold in the New York City area.  No illnesses have
been reported to date.

Consumers who have allergies to eggs and purchased "Thelma
Mayonnaise" are urged to return it to the place of purchase.


KO SECURITIES: SEC Asserts Securities Violations V. Firm, Trader
----------------------------------------------------------------
The Securities and Exchange Commission found that Ko Securities,
Inc. and Terrance Y. Yoshikawa, of Seattle, Washington, violated
NASD Conduct Rules 3370 and 2110 by executing short sales
without making and annotating the affirmative determinations
required for each short sale, and Rule 17a-3 of the Securities
Exchange Act of 1934 and NASD Conduct Rule 2110 by failing to
maintain certain records in connection with those short sales.

On May 4, 1998, Ko and Mr. Yoshikawa sold short several thousand
shares of stock without obtaining the requisite affirmative
determination.  The affirmative determination rule generally
prohibits an NASD member from executing a short sale unless the
member makes an "affirmative determination" that the member can
borrow the securities or otherwise provide for delivery of the
securities by the settlement date.  Neither Ko nor Mr. Yoshikawa
made the requisite affirmative determination.  Ko and Mr.
Yoshikawa also neglected to include certain required information
on their customer orders.

NASD fined Ko and Mr. Yoshikawa $147,450.81 jointly and
severally for the affirmative determination violation, and fined
Ko an additional $15,000 for the record keeping violations.

The Commission sustained NASD's findings of the affirmative
determination violations and the record keeping violations.  The
Commission sustained the sanctions imposed on Ko and Mr.
Yoshikawa for the record keeping violations.  The Commission
remanded for reconsideration NASD sanctions with respect to the
affirmative determination violations because it was unclear how
NASD determined the amount of the fine.


L90 INC.: SEC Files Civil, Criminal Complaints For Stock Fraud
--------------------------------------------------------------
The Securities and Exchange Commission, the United States
Attorney's Office in Los Angeles, California and the Federal
Bureau of Investigation jointly announced the filing of civil
and criminal complaints against Thomas A. Sebastian, the former
chief financial officer of L90, Inc., a former internet
advertising firm now known as MaxWorldwide, Inc.

The civil and criminal actions allege that Mr. Sebastian
participated in a scheme to generate fraudulent revenues through
advertising barter transactions with other Internet companies in
order to meet securities analysts' revenue estimates.  At the
time of the offenses, L90 was based in Santa Monica and Marina
del Rey, California, and its stock was traded on the NASDAQ
National Market System.

According to the allegations in the Commission's complaint and
the criminal complaint, L90, through its subsidiary
webMillion.com, engaged in a series of advertising barter
transactions with other Internet companies, swapped checks with
those companies for the purported "value" of the bartered
advertising, and fraudulently recorded those amounts as revenue
without disclosing that they resulted from barter transactions.

Frequently, L90 inserted a sham third party into the check swap
in order to hide the true nature of the barter transaction from
its auditors and the investing public.  Mr. Sebastian concealed
the use of the third party from L90's auditor and made false
representations to the auditor about L90's financial statements.
He also signed L90's Form 10-K and Forms 10-Q that were filed
with the Commission containing false and misleading financial
information.  Furthermore, Mr. Sebastian made false and
misleading statements concerning L90's revenue numbers on
quarterly conference calls with analysts and investors.

Through the fraudulent barter transactions, L90 overstated its
revenues in the third quarter of 2000 through the third quarter
of 2001 by at least $4.3 million, or 7.9 percent overall, and by
as much as 29 percent in one quarter.  As a result, L90 was able
to meet analysts' revenue estimates in all but one of these
quarters.

Mr. Sebastian, a 39-year-old resident of Virginia, was L90's CFO
from July 1999 until he was placed on administrative leave on
March 10, 2002.   He resigned on March 19, 2002.

The criminal complaint, which was filed September 24, 2003, in
the United States District Court in Los Angeles, California
charges Mr. Sebastian with conspiring to commit securities
fraud, a charge that carries a maximum of five years
imprisonment.  Mr. Sebastian will be summoned to appear in
federal court in Los Angeles on October 21.

The Commission's complaint, which was filed September 25, 2003,
in United States District Court in Los Angeles, alleges that Mr.
Sebastian violated or aided and abetted violations of numerous
provisions of the federal securities laws, including the
antifraud provisions of Section 17(a) of the Securities Act of
1933 and Section 10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
and Rule 10b-5 thereunder; the reporting provisions of Section
13(a) of the Exchange Act and Rules 12b-20, 13a-1, and 13a-13
thereunder; the record-keeping provisions of Exchange Act Rule
13b2-1; the internal control provisions of Section 13(b)(5) of
the Exchange Act; and the lying to the auditors provisions of
Exchange Act Rule 13b2-2.

The Commission is seeking a permanent injunction, disgorgement
of all ill-gotten gains, a civil penalty, and an order barring
Mr. Sebastian from serving as an officer or director of a public
company.

The Commission and the United States Attorney's Office
previously charged three former L90 officers for their
involvement in the fraudulent barter scheme.  John C. Bohan,
L90's former CEO, president, and board member; Mark D. Roah,
L90's former senior vice president of business development and
board member; and Lucrezia Bickerton, L90's former vice
president of finance, all pleaded guilty to criminal charges and
settled with the Commission without admitting or denying the
Commission's allegations.  Mr. Bohan's sentencing is scheduled
for late January, by United States District Judge Percy
Anderson. Mr. Roah and Ms. Bickerton are scheduled to be
sentenced in February.

Two of L90's fraudulent round-trip transactions involved
Homestore.com, Inc.  In previous actions, the Commission has
charged a total of 11 individuals for their roles in a scheme to
inflate Homestore's on-line advertising revenues.  Seven of
those individuals have also been criminally charged by the
United States Attorney's Office in Los Angeles.  That
investigation remains ongoing.

The Commission also previously ordered MaxWorldwide, Inc.,
formerly known as L90, Inc., to cease and desist from violating
the reporting, record keeping, and internal control provisions
of the federal securities laws.  The Commission found, among
other things, that L90 materially overstated its revenues in
2000 and 2001 as a result of the improper barter transactions.
MaxWorldwide consented to the entry of the order without
admitting or denying the Commission's findings.


MARCOS LITIGATION: Trial In Marcos Lawsuit Set For January 2004
---------------------------------------------------------------
A United States federal judge set for January 12, 2004, the
trial date for attorneys trying to have $40 million in Marcos'
assets released to begin paying the verdict.  The $40 million is
among assets, lawyers say, were obtained illegally by the Marcos
regime and stashed in accounts around the world, the Associated
Press reports.

The money, originally held by a Panamanian corporation, was
transferred to an escrow account because of competing ownership
claims by the Marcos estate, the Philippine government, and the
human rights victims.  It is separate from some $683 million in
frozen Swiss assets that the Philippine Supreme Court awarded to
the Philippine government in July of this year.

Philippine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo has said some of
those funds will go to the human rights abuse victims.  The
9,539 Filipinos sued the Marcos estate in 1986, the year the
late former dictator was deposed and fled to Hawaii.  He died in
exile in 1989.

In 1995, a jury awarded plaintiffs $2 billion after finding Mr.
Marcos responsible for summary executions, disappearances and
tortures committed during his 20-year rule.  The judgment,
stalled in court, has grown to $3.1 billion with interest.  None
of the plaintiffs has received any money.

In re Estate of Ferdinand E. Marcos Human Rights Litigation, MDL
No. 840, C.A. No. 86-0390 was filed in the U.S. District Court
of the District of Hawaii before Judge Manuel L. Real.
Plaintiffs in this action were represented by attorney Robert
Swift of Kohn Swift & Graf P.C. as lead counsel and Sherry
Broder as liaison counsel.


MEDCO HEALTH: Government Launches Kickback Lawsuit
--------------------------------------------------
The United States government filed a lawsuit, accusing Medco
Health Solutions, the nation's largest pharmacy benefit-
management company, of receiving kickbacks from drug
manufacturers for persuading doctors to switch patients to
medications produced by the firms, AP Newswire reports.

Prosecutors said the kickbacks Medco received from the drug
manufacturers - most notably from its former owner, Merck & Co.
- corrupted a legitimate program that aims to get doctors to
switch their patients to less costly but equivalent medications.
In 2001, the lawsuit said, Medco received $430 million in
kickbacks from Merck & Co.

The lawsuit alleges Medco ignored safety rules at its mail-order
drug centers, altering its records to avoid paying penalties and
failing to follow state laws requiring pharmacists to consult
with doctors about certain prescriptions.

The suit claims Medco required employees at mail-order centers
in Florida, Texas, Nevada and Massachusetts to alter computer
records to make older prescriptions appear as if they had just
been received.  Altering the records, the lawsuit said, allowed
the company to avoid paying late penalties to its clients, which
are large employee health plans.

The Prosecutors said that Medco also assigned poorly trained
assistants to a range of duties normally performed by
pharmacists, including calling doctors to confirm prescriptions.
Those assistants were expected to speak with 20 to 25 physicians
each hour - a quota the government said was too difficult to
meet.  As a result, the lawsuit claimed, the assistants
sometimes skipped the call and then fabricated records to make
it appear as if they had taken place.

Medco, based in Franklin Lakes, N.J., acknowledged that some
violations cited in the complaint occurred, but said they were
isolated incidents that happened years ago and that the
individuals who did it have since been caught and fired.  It
called the charges either false or overstated.

"The full story will show that our people are highly skilled,
our policies are rigorously enforced and our pharmacy practices,
which are regularly inspected by state boards of pharmacy, lead
our industry in lowering the cost of providing high-quality
health care for millions of Americans," David Snow, the
company's top executive, said in a statement.

The violations at Medco's mail-order pharmacies occurred as a
result of the company's failure to meet productivity deadlines,
the government said.

The qui tam actions USA ex rel. Hunt and Gauger v. Medco, case
number 99-CV-2332 and USA ex rel. Piacentile v. Medco, case
number 00-CV-737 filed in the US District Court for the Eastern
District of Pennsylvania, were consolidated and assigned to
Judge Anita Brody.  The handling of this case by the US
Attorney's Office is primarily assigned to Associate US Attorney
James G. Sheehan.


MICROSOFT CORPORATION: Lindows Stands Firm On Settlement Website
----------------------------------------------------------------
San Diego-based software company Lindows.com boldy told
Microsoft Corporation that it would not remove a Web site that
offers to process claims for Californians entitled to proceeds
from a $1.1 billion class action settlement with the software
giant, Yahoo Newswire reports.

Lindows, which sells a Linux operating system, said Microsoft
sent it a letter Friday ordering it to take down the site,
MSfreePC.com, claiming it is deceptive, mischaracterizes terms
of the settlement and may cause consumers to have their legal
claims rejected by a claims administrator.  The letter from
Microsoft lawyer Robert Rosenfeld, released by Lindows on
Monday, said the Company threatened to take "all appropriate
action to protect the integrity of the settlement claims
process" if Lindows failed to explain how it will take
"corrective actions."

Lindows' responded by saying it would continue to promote the
service, which offers an "instant settlement" that can be used
to buy Lindows products.  "Our plan is to continue to offer the
MSfreePC service in spite of your threats.  If required, we will
be a voice in the courtroom defending a consumer's right to use
technology and an online process to secure their settlement
claims," according to the letter signed by Robertson.

The company also offers free computers to the first 10,000
respondents who qualify for the settlement.  The settlement,
reached in January, came in response to a 1999 lawsuit on
behalf of California consumers and businesses that claimed
Microsoft violated the state's antitrust and unfair competition
laws.  Proceeds from the deal were distributed in the form of
vouchers redeemable for computers that run on the operating
system of their choice as well as other peripherals and/or
software from any provider.

Norm Hawker, a business professor at Western Michigan University
and research fellow at the American Antitrust Institute in
Washington, said it does not appear Lindows is violating the
spirit of the settlement by offering to process claims for
consumers. "In general, something like that is legal," he said,
comparing the service to a private accounting company processing
tax returns in which they issue filers instant refunds.

In December, a federal jury in Seattle will hear Microsoft's
complaint that the Lindows name infringes on its Windows
trademark.


MICROSOFT CORPORATION: Reaches $10.5M Pact For Consumer Lawsuit
---------------------------------------------------------------
Microsoft Corporation agreed to pay $10.5 million to settle a
class action filed on behalf of customers who bought software
directly from the No. 1 software maker, Reuters reports.

In exchange for Microsoft agreeing to pay each purchaser a
portion of the price paid for software bought up until April 30,
2003, consumers and businesses who bought Microsoft's software
directly from the company's Web site or direct marketing
campaigns have agreed to drop their charges.  Both sides said
the total payout would amount to $10.5 million.

Earlier this month, Microsoft settled an antitrust suit by Be,
Inc. by agreeing to pay the failed software developer $23
million to drop its suit accusing Microsoft of destroying its
business through anti-competitive practices.

The Redmond, Washington-based company also reached a $750
million settlement and strategic partnership with AOL Time
Warner Inc. in May, while a lawsuit by Sun Microsystems Inc.
remains pending.

"Microsoft is pleased to have reached a mutually satisfactory
settlement with these plaintiffs, and believes that resolution
of this case is another step in our effort to resolve these
issues so we can focus on the future," Tom Burt, Microsoft's
deputy general counsel for litigation, said in a statement.

The settlement, which is pending in the US District Court in
Maryland, awaits approval by US District Judge J. Frederick
Motz.

The consumers class action against Microsoft was filed in the US
District Court of the District of Baltimore County, Maryland and
its pending settlement must be approved by Judge J. Frederick
Motz.  The defendant is represented by Tom Burt, Microsoft's
deputy general counsel for litigation.


MUTUAL FUNDS: Four Funds In NY Attorney General Probe Face Suits
----------------------------------------------------------------
The four fund groups named by New York Attorney General Eliot
Spitzer as being involved in illegal trading of mutual funds
shares, are facing more than 20 lawsuits from both class actions
and individual shareholders, according to the Financial Times.

The lawsuits come as Mr. Spitzer said his review of the illicit
practices was far from complete and that there would be more
fallout to come.  About 30 funds have received subpoenas
requiring them to provide information about possible market
timing of their shares.

Bank of America and Janus, two of the fund groups named, have
said they will reimburse fund shareholders for any money lost as
a result of the illegal late trading of their mutual fund shares
or through the groups' allowing a hedge fund to engage in market
timing of their shares.

Unlike stocks, mutual funds are only priced once a day based on
the most recent prices of the underlying securities, many of
which may not have traded for hours.  For example, a US-listed
fund containing Japanese stocks is priced at the close of trade
in New York at 4 p.m., with the Japanese stock prices based on
the close of trade in Tokyo many hours earlier.  However, in the
intervening hours there might have been several significant news
events likely to affect the value of the Japanese shares.  The
market timer buys the fund near the close of trade, knowing
whether it is likely to trade up or down the next day.

European financial houses that have rebuffed approaches by US
hedge funds in recent months include Threadneedle, part of
American Express, and Standard Life Investments.  Others, such
as UBS and Union, have kicked out unwanted investors.

Apart from charging redemption fees that make it unprofitable
for quick traders to operate, fund groups can employ "fair value
pricing" to adjust outdated asset values and make the trading
unprofitable.  This method attempts to set a theoretical price
for the overseas stocks based on what has happened since their
markets closed.  Although not perfect, it results in a fund
being priced more closely to its value.


NETWORK ASSOCIATES: Reaches Agreement For Shareholders Lawsuits
---------------------------------------------------------------
Network Associates Inc. agreed to pay a group of shareholders
$70 million to settle some class actions over allegations that
the company misled investors by overloading its resellers with
inventory in an effort to book more revenue, Yahoo Newswire
reports.

Under NAI's accounting practices at the time, the company
recognized revenue when it shipped products to resellers,
instead of when the reseller actually sold the product.  NAI has
since changed that practice.

The suits, filed in 2000 and 2001, were just part of a messy
picture relating to some accounting problems that resulted in
the resignation of several top NAI executives as well as ongoing
investigations by the Department of Justice and the Securities
and Exchange Commission.  Much of the executive team that was in
place at the time of the lawsuits, including former CEO Bill
Larson and Peter Watkins, the former president, were named
in the lawsuits.

Current CEO George Samenuk said in a statement that he was
pleased to have the lawsuits done with.  The company also said
on Monday that it will file its 2002 annual report on Oct. 31,
having delayed the filing, along with reports for the first half
of this year, as a result of the Department of Justice
investigation.

Earlier this year, Terry Davis, a former NAI executive pleaded
guilty to securities fraud in connection with the accounting
investigations.  The settlement awaits approval by the US
District Court for Northern California.


NEW ZEALAND: Bishop Apologizes After Abuse Charges V. Boys' Home
----------------------------------------------------------------
The Sedgley Boys Home in Masterton, New Zealand is facing
charges by a 54 year-old-man who was allegedly sexually abused
more than 40 years ago while staying at the home, the Wairarapa
Times Age reports.

The former Sedgley Boys Home housed many boys from 1939 until
1988, until it closed.  The unnamed man alleged that he was
sexually abused by a male staff member, who is still alive, but
in his nineties.

Anglican Bishop of Wellington, the Rt. Rev. Dr. Thomas Brown has
issued a statement "with deep regret," saying that the former
Sedgley resident's life "has been desperately affected."  He
said that the church was determined that such situations would
never happen again.  "The diocese has made it obligatory for all
church workers who deal with children and young people (clergy
and lay people) to undergo a police check," he said.
"Pedophilia has zero tolerance."

He added that the offender was now a very old man suffering from
senility and that police have investigated the claims.  No
charges have been laid, however, the Wairarapa Times Age states.

"That leaves the accusation untried.  However, there is no
doubt in my mind that the complainant believes he has suffered
grievously and a deep wound has stayed with him ever since," the
Bishop added.  "This is a matter of great and abiding sorrow.
The diocese has extended its sympathy to the complainant and
expressed its genuine regret for the hurt being experienced by
him."

Media officer for the Anglican diocese Father David Best said
the alleged offender was now well into his 90s.  Father Best
said the church's involvement with Sedgley Boys Home had only
been "tenuous", appointing trustees to the home who in turn
appointed staff.  "(The Anglican Church) doesn't now and didn't
then hire and fire staff.  That was not the responsibility of
the church."

Sedgley Family Centre board spokeswoman Lisa Rossiter said
Bishop Brown had only asked them yesterday to investigate the
allegation, the Wairarapa Times Age stated.  The board's first
step would be to examine board minutes from the time of the
alleged incident and see if anything had been spoken about then
and to try and find former trust members

A few weeks ago, the former Salvation Army-run Whatman Home in
Masterton was similarly charged, and residents of that home
planned to mount a class action against the Salvation Army.


OAKGRIGSBY INC.: IL Court Rules V. Ex-President in SEC Complaint
----------------------------------------------------------------
An Illinois federal court entered, by consent, an order
permanently enjoining defendant James C. Horne, of Lake Bluff,
Illinois, from future violations of the antifraud, periodic
reporting, books and records and internal accounting controls
provisions of the federal securities laws, according to the
Securities and Exchange Commission's News Digest.

The order also holds Mr. Horne liable for disgorgement and
interest totaling almost $100,000, but waives payment of all but
$20,000, and does not impose a penalty, based on Mr. Horne's
sworn representations and other documents submitted concerning
his financial condition.  At the time of the conduct at issue,
Mr. Horne was the president of OakGrigsby, Inc., a Sugar Grove,
Illinois company that was a division of Oak Industries, Inc.,
headquartered in Waltham, Massachusetts.

The Commission's complaint, filed on September 27, 2000, alleged
that, between July 1995 and January 1997, Mr. Horne and Matthew
R. Welch, the former controller of OakGrigsby, conspired to
fraudulently conceal OakGrigsby's operating expenses such as
salaries, shipping and travel.  OakGrigsby's results were
consolidated with those of other Oak divisions and incorporated
into Oak's periodic Commission filings and press releases.  As a
result of Mr. Horne and Mr. Welch's actions, Oak's income per
share for the fourth quarter of 1995 and for the first three
quarters of 1996 were materially overstated.

According to the complaint, the defendants were, at least in
part, motivated to undertake the scheme in order to ensure that
OakGrigsby met specified earnings targets, which allowed Mr.
Horne to earn a bonus of $55,000 for 1995.  The disgorgement
ordered by the Court was of Horne's 1995 bonus.  Mr. Welch has
previously settled the Commission's action.

The Commission's complaint charged Mr. Horne with, and the Court
permanently enjoined him from, violating Section 10(b) of the
Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Rule 10b-5 thereunder
(antifraud provisions), Exchange Act Rule 13b2-1 (prohibiting
falsification of issuer books and records), and aiding and
abetting violations of Sections 13(a), 13(b)(2)(A) and
13(b)(2)(B) of the Exchange Act and Rules 12b-20, 13a-1 and 13a-
13 thereunder (issuer reporting, books and records and internal
accounting controls provisions).

The order, entered by the Honorable Ronald A. Guzman, held Mr.
Horne liable for disgorgement of $55,000, plus prejudgment
interest of $39,574, or a total of $94,574, but waived payment
of all but $20,000  based on Mr. Horne's financial condition.


QWEST COMMUNICATIONS: SEC Settles Securities Fraud Proceeding
-------------------------------------------------------------
The Securities and Exchange Commission instituted and
simultaneously settled a cease-and-desist proceeding against
Loren D. Pfau, a resident of Evergreen, Colorado and former
employee of Qwest Communications International, Inc.  In
addition, the Commission filed a related action for civil
penalties against Mr. Pfau in the United States District Court
for the District of Colorado.

In the Order, In the Matter of Loren D. Pfau (33-8295), the
Commission found that in the final days of each quarter from
December 2000 through June 2001, Qwest used Indefeasible Right
of Use (IRU) agreements to sell fiber-optic cable from its
telecommunications network as a means to meet aggressive revenue
targets.  An IRU is an irrevocable right to use a specific
amount of fiber for a specified time period.  Qwest accounted
for IRUs as sales-type leases and recognized nearly the entire
amount of the IRU revenue up-front at the time of contract
execution, rather than over the life of the IRU agreement.

Qwest employees and management commonly referred to IRU sales as
gap fillers, in other words, a means to make up the shortfall
between the aggressive revenue projections as publicly announced
by Qwest and the actual revenue earned.

Specifically, the Commission found that in three IRU
transactions executed between December 2000 and June 2001, Ms.
Pfau, then a Qwest sales manager, along with Qwest senior
management, provided secret side agreements allowing the
purchasers of fiber-optic cable to exchange (or port) the fiber
purchased for different fiber at a later date.

The explicit purpose of making the side agreements secret was to
conceal from Qwest's accountants and outside auditors the
purchasers' ability to port, since such exchange rights would
have defeated, under generally accepted accounting principles,
the up-front revenue recognition sought by Qwest.

According to the Commission's findings, Qwest improperly
recognized from the three IRU transactions $26.6 million of
revenue in the first and second quarters of 2001.  As a result,
Qwest's quarterly reports for the first and second quarters of
2001, and its annual report for 2001, contained materially false
information.

Without admitting or denying the findings in the Commission's
Order, Mr. Pfau has agreed to settle the Commission's claims by
consenting to the entry of an administrative order requiring him
to cease and desist from committing or causing any violations
and any future violations of Section 17(a) of the Securities Act
of 1933, and Sections 10(b) and 13(b)(5) of the Securities
Exchange Act of 1934 and Rules 10b-5 and 13b2-1 thereunder, and
from causing any violations and any future violations of
Sections 13(a) and 13(b)(2)(A) of the Exchange Act and Rules
12b-20, 13a-1 and 13a-13 thereunder.

The Commission's complaint in the district court action alleges
the same conduct referenced above, and Ms. Pfau, without
admitting or denying the allegations in the complaint, has
consented to the entry of judgment by the US District Court
requiring him to pay a civil penalty of $25,000.  In settling
for a  $25,000 penalty, the Commission considered Ms. Pfau's
cooperation in connection with the Commission's ongoing
investigation of this matter.


REMMINGTON ADVISERS: SEC Starts Proceedings For Securities Fraud
----------------------------------------------------------------
The Securities and Exchange Commission instituted administrative
proceedings pursuant to Sections 203(e) and 203(f) of the
Investment Advisers Act of 1940 against Remmington Advisors,
Inc., a registered investment adviser, and Kenneth Randall Ward,
Remmington's principal.

The administrative proceeding seeks to determine whether
remedial action against Remmington and Mr. Ward is in the public
interest, based on Mr. Ward's willful violations of Section
17(a) of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 10(b) of the
Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

The Division of Enforcement alleges that, on March 19, 2003, the
Commission issued an opinion concluding that Mr. Ward committed
willful violations of the antifraud provisions of the Securities
Act and Exchange Act through the offer and sale, and in
connection with the purchase and sale, of inverse floater
mortgage derivative securities to two Texas municipalities.

In the Matter of Ward, Admin. Proc. File No. 3-9327, Release No.
34-47535 (March 19, 2003), the Commission imposed sanctions on
Mr. Ward in the public interest, including permanently barring
him from association with any broker or dealer.  In barring Mr.
Ward, the Commission stated that he "represents a threat to the
investing public" and his actions "demonstrate a callous
willingness to exploit, for personal benefit and without regard
for the impact on others, the trust placed in him by investors."

A hearing will be scheduled before an administrative law judge
to determine whether the allegations contained in the Order are
true, to provide Remmington and Mr. Ward an opportunity to
dispute the allegations, and to determine what, if any, remedial
sanctions are appropriate in the public interest.


RIVERSIDE FUNERAL: ID Atty. General Lodges Customer Fraud Suit
--------------------------------------------------------------
Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden filed a lawsuit against
Mitchell and Kimberly McBride, former owners of Riverside
Funeral Home in Garden City.  The lawsuit alleges that more than
200 area citizens purchased funeral home packages and that the
McBrides did not put the funds in trust as required by Idaho
law.

"These Idahoans spent thousands of dollars to ensure that their
funeral expenses were paid and their burial wishes were arranged
before they died," Attorney General Wasden said.  "Now they are
forced to buy another funeral plan, a heavy burden for seniors
living on fixed incomes."

The Attorney General's Consumer Protection Unit and the Bureau
of Occupational Licenses compiled a list of customers who
purchased pre-need funeral arrangements from the owners or
employees of Riverside Funeral Home between July 2000 and July
2003.

The Attorney General is seeking restitution for the victims,
civil penalties of up to $5,000 for each violation of the Idaho
Consumer Protection Act, and reimbursement for attorney fees,
costs, and investigation expenses.

Mr. McBride's Idaho mortician's license was suspended earlier
this year by the Idaho Board of Morticians and the Board will
seek permanent revocation of his license at a hearing next
month.  Kimberly McBride was never licensed by the Idaho Board
of Morticians to sell funeral packages.  The McBrides have also
filed a Chapter 11 bankruptcy, which is currently pending in
federal court.

"Although we were not able to determine the exact amount of
money the McBrides took from their customers, my office
estimates the amount at more than $200,000," Attorney General
Wasden said.


SPORT-HALEY INC.: SEC Launches Civil Fraud Charges in CO Court
--------------------------------------------------------------
The Securities and Exchange Commission filed civil fraud charges
against Sport-Haley, Inc., Robert G. Tomlinson, the company's
current chairman and former chief executive officer, and Steve
S. Auger, the company's former controller, alleging that they
materially misstated the company's financial statements during
its 1998, 1999, and 2000 fiscal years by improperly accounting
for inventory, period costs, and losses on sales of headwear
equipment.

The Commission's lawsuit, which was brought in the United States
District Court in the District of Colorado, seeks anti-fraud
injunctions, civil money penalties, disgorgement of ill-gotten
gains and, as to Mr. Tomlinson and Mr. Auger, permanent bars
from service as an officer or director of a public company.

The Commission's complaint alleges that Sport-Haley materially
overstated inventory in its financial statements during its 1998
and 1999 fiscal years.  Mr. Tomlinson and Mr. Auger knowingly
concealed that inventory was materially overstated by $1.2
million at June 30, 1999 and agreed to eliminate the overstated
inventory by writing the inventory off at the rate of $100,000
per month during its 2000 fiscal year.

Sport-Haley failed to disclose the inventory overstatement or
the company's elaborate measures to adjust the financial
statements for the overstatement.  Sport-Haley materially
understated expenses related to period costs in financial
statements filed with the Commission during its 1998 and 1999
fiscal years and first three quarters of 2000.

Mr. Tomlinson and Mr. Auger knowingly or recklessly allowed the
company to materially misstate losses on the sale of headwear
equipment in Sport-Haley's 1999 year-end financial statements
and quarterly financial statements during the first three
quarters of its 2000 fiscal year.  Mr. Tomlinson and Mr. Auger
reviewed and signed filings with the Commission that they knew
or were reckless in not knowing contained false financial
statements.

The Commission's complaint seeks an order against all defendants
enjoining them from further violations of the antifraud,
reporting, books-and-records, and internal controls provisions
of the federal securities laws; imposing civil money penalties;
and ordering disgorgement of all ill-gotten gains.

The Commission further seeks orders against Mr. Tomlinson and
Mr. Auger permanently barring them from acting as a director or
officer of a publicly held company.


THIMEROSAL LITIGATION: Danish Study Asserts No Link To Autism
-------------------------------------------------------------
A Danish child-by-child study published in the October 1 issue
of the Journal of the American Medical Association states that
no relationship was found between thimerosal and childhood
developmental problems such as autism, HealthDayNews reports.

Thimerosal, a mercury preservative, was added to vaccines in the
1930s to kill potentially dangerous germs.  Thimerosal contains
ethylmercury, high doses of which are known to damage brain
cells.  It is unknown, however, if low doses are hazardous.  In
1999, vaccine makers started to remove thimerosal from vaccines
because of recommendations from the US Public Health Service and
other medical groups.

Last year, a study by the US Institute of Medicine stated that
there was no increased incidence of problems in children who got
thimerosal-containing vaccines.  However, the panel continued to
recommend thimerosal's removal from vaccines, saying it is
"biologically plausible" that cumulative exposure to the
chemical might make children vulnerable to mercury-related
disorders.

The Statens Serum Institute in Copenhagen study compared the
incidence of childhood problems including autism, attention
deficit/hyperactivity disorder and developmental delays in
children who were vaccinated with a thimerosal-containing
pertussis (whooping cough) vaccine and those who got an
additive-free vaccine, HealthDayNews reports.

The study compared records on all the 467,450 children born in
Denmark between January 1, 1990, and December 31, 1996.
However, it found no significant difference between the
incidence of autism and other such problems in children who got
vaccine with or without thimerosal, and no indications of a
dose-response relationship between autism and the amount of
ethylmercury received through thimerosal.

"This is a study that overcomes the problem previous studies
have had," study author Dr. Mads Melbye, a professor of
epidemiology at the institute told HealthDayNews.  "In Denmark,
we have an identifiable registry on all childhood vaccinations
going back to 1990 . since then we have been able to follow up
all these children with respect to the eventual development of
autism. We compute that there is no difference in the risk of
autism in those children who got the vaccine with or without
thimerosal."

"Previous studies have not looked at personally identifiable
data," he continued.  "We were able to look at the incidence
curve for autism and find no sign that it correlates with
thimerosal exposure."

However, researches did find a significant increase of diagnosed
cases of autism spectrum disorders during the study period,
similar to what has been observed in other countries.  "No one
knows why this increase is taking place," Dr. Melbye says, and
the study was not designed to answer that question.

However, this report is not enough to stop numerous lawsuits
claiming such a relationship.  James Farrell of the Houston law
firm R.G. Taylor Associates, said that from a lawyer's point of
view, "the Danish study is not very good . from the scientific
standpoint, it really doesn't answer the question."

Atty. Farrell estimates that 3,800 thimerosal lawsuits are
pending nationwide.  He said most courts ruled that class status
is not appropriate, because "they think that the damage varies
too much from child to child, as well as the types of exposure."

"Eventually, all these cases will go before juries around the
country," he told HealthDayNews.  "All of them are early on in
the discovery process."


UNITED STATES: Land Bureau Faces Lawsuit Over Pact With Rancher
---------------------------------------------------------------
Western Watersheds Project of Hailey, Idaho and American Lands
Alliance of Washington, D.C., filed a suit Thursday in US
District Court in the District of Columbia against top officials
of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), objecting to a unique
settlement in favor of Thermopolis-area rancher Harvey Frank
Robbins, the Star Tribune reports.

The suit alleges unlawful actions and failures of action by the
top leadership of the BLM, "who have overridden the scientific
and professional judgment of BLM staff in order to favor a
wealthy and politically powerful rancher, granting him grazing
privileges and preferences in violation of the nation's laws and
regulations governing public lands grazing."

The lawsuit, aimed not at Robbins, but at the settlement with
the BLM, and the BLM officials who authorized the settlement:
allegedly Kathleen Clarke, director of the bureau and Francis
Cherry, her deputy director, alleges violations of the Federal
Land Policy and Management Act, Taylor Grazing Act, and the Code
of Federal Regulations.

"I understand the BLM is conducting its own internal
investigation," said Laird Lucas, an attorney for Advocates for
the West, a Boise-based, nonprofit, conservation law firm.
"We're hoping this will prod the BLM into a settlement."

Mr. Lucas and associate Lauren Rule have teamed up with Jonathan
Lovvorn of Meyer & Glitzenstein in Washington, D.C.  Mr. Lucas
said the suit does not allege violation of the Endangered
Species Act, but that he's investigating biologists' statements
that grizzly bears inhabit Mr. Robbins' ranches and whether a
grizzly bear was illegally shot and killed. An ESA complaint
that BLM did not consult with the US Fish and Wildlife Service
over grizzly bears observed on Robbins' Owl Creek allotments
could be filed separately or added as an amendment.

Mr. Lucas said the federal government has 60 days to respond.
If the case is still ongoing in the spring, he said he may seek
injunctive relief, The Star Tribune states.

Celia Boddington, spokeswoman for BLM headquarters, told the
Star Tribune the lawsuit is still under review and the bureau
has no comment as yet.

Western Watersheds Project is a nonprofit conservation
organization focused on protecting and conserving public lands
and natural resources of watersheds in the West.  American Lands
Alliance is a nonprofit conservation organization that works
with grassroots organizations and individuals to protect and
preserve desert, forest, and aquatic ecosystems.


UNUMPROVIDENT CORPORATION: Announces New CEO Amidst Stock Suits
---------------------------------------------------------------
UnumProvident Corporation, the nation's largest disability
insurer, named Thomas R. Watjen, 49, as its top executive,
replacing Former CEO J. Harold Chandler, who was fired in March,
ending an interim appointment amid hundreds of claims-handling
lawsuits and regulator investigations in 40 states, AP Newswire
reports.

At least two complaints seeking class-action status have been
filed since the company announced in February that it had
recorded investment losses of $93 million.  The lawsuits, filed
by hundreds of policyholders, contend that UnumProvident
routinely denies claims and requires its medical employees to
support the denials.

The company has described the complaints as "entirely without
merit."  Georgia insurance officials imposed a $1 million fine
in March.

Mr. Watjen joined UnumProvident in 1994 as executive vice
president and chief financial officer.  In May 2002, he was
promoted to vice chairman and chief operating officer and
elected to the board.

UnumProvident, created by the 1999 merger of the Unum
Corporation of Portland, Maine, and The Provident Companies,
based in Chattanooga, claims about 30 percent of the nation's
disability insurance business.


                 New Securities Fraud Cases


ALSTOM SA: Scott + Scott Lodges Securities Fraud Lawsuit in CT
--------------------------------------------------------------
Scott + Scott, LLC initiated a securities class action on behalf
of an institutional investor in the United States District Court
for the District of Connecticut on behalf of purchasers of
ALSTOM S.A. (NYSE: ALS) or (Paris: ALSO.PA) securities after
November 17, 1998.

The complaint, filed in the United States charges Alstom and
certain of its officials and directors with violations of the
securities laws (Securities Exchange Act of 1934). Alstom is
engaged in power generation, power transmission, power
distribution and ship construction in France.

The complaint alleges that during the Class Period, the
individual defendants engaged in a scheme to conceal Alstom's
problems growing its Marine segment in order to prevent the
decline in the price of Alstom securities for reasons including
to protect and enhance executive positions and substantial
compensation, raise Euro 387 million in a share offering on June
19, 2001, as well as Euro 630 million in a rights offering on
June 4, 2002 and enhance the value of their personal Alstom
securities holdings and options.

It was important to Alstom to be perceived favorably and to
minimize the risks associated with its liquidity so that it
could raise the necessary financing to fund its business.
Alstom's bank borrowings increased from Euro 839 million at
March 31, 1999, to Euro 2.7 billion at March 31, 2000, to Euro
4.5 billion at March 31, 2001.

The complaint alleges defendants concealed the off-balance-sheet
risk associated with guarantees on debt incurred by customers,
including Renaissance Cruises, Inc. ("Renaissance"), making
purchases from Alstom's fastest growing segment.

The true facts, which the complaint alleges were known to the
defendants but concealed from the shareholders, were:

     (1) that the Company's first half financials results for FY
         2000, were grossly overstated;

     (2) that the disastrous problems associated with the
         Company's GT24B and FT26B turbines was causing
         customers to back out of their prior turbine orders;

     (3) that the Company had failed to timely and adequately
         account for the liabilities associated with the
         Company's gas turbines (customers requesting
         compensation payment rather than a correction of the
         turbines) and transport problems totaling in excess of
         Euro 1 billion and plunging the Company into a loss of
         Euro 1.4 billion in FY 2003;

     (4) that the Company's "under funding" of its pension
         liabilities was materially "under stated" by in excess
         of Euro 500 million; and

     (5) that the Company failed to timely disclose its
         liabilities associated with vendor financing and
         Renaissance cruise ships.

The complaint also alleges that until November 2002, the Company
concealed its exposure to 60 separate asbestos lawsuits
involving 6,500 plaintiffs.  The Company failed to account for
these liabilities and thus overstated its financial statement by
as much as Euro 60 million.

The Company's asset disposal program was well behind schedule
and that its projected goal of raising proceeds of Euro 1.4
billion by March 2003 was a fallacy.  Even the Company's
November 2002 revised guidance associated with restructuring the
Company's Transport business was grossly in excess of Euro 51
million; the Company had materially understated its losses
associated with a rail car contract by guarantees to banks that
had loaned money to cruise lines so they could purchase ships
from the Company and thereby inflate the Company's revenue via
ship sales; and the Company actually understated the Company's
net debt by Euro 2 billion via its vendor financing scheme.

For more details, contact David R. Scott or Neil Rothstein by
Mail: 108 Norwich Avenue Colchester, Connecticut 064515 by
Phone: 800-404-7770 by Fax: 860-537-4432 or by E-mail:
drscott@scott-scott.com or nrothstein@aol.com.


BANK OF AMERICA: Rabin Murray Lodges Securities Suit in N.D. CA
---------------------------------------------------------------
Rabin Murray and Frank LLP initiated a securities class action
in United States District Court for the Northern District of
California, case number 03-CV-6957, on behalf of all persons or
entities who purchased or otherwise acquired Nations Strategic
Growth Fund (Nasdaq:NSGAX) (Nasdaq:NSIBX) (Nasdaq:NSGCX),
(Nasdaq:NSEPX), Nations Asset Allocation Fund (Nasdaq:PHAAX)
(Nasdaq:NBASX) (Nasdaq:NAACX) (Nasdaq:NSEPX), and the Nations
Funds family of funds owned and operated by Bank of America
Corporation (NYSE:BAC), and its subsidiaries and affiliates,
between October 1, 1998 and July 3, 2003, inclusive.

The complaint names Bank of America Corporation, Banc of America
Capital Management, LLC, Bank of America Advisors, LLC, Nations
Funds Inc., Robert H. Gordon, Theodore H. Sihpol III., Charles
D. Bryceland, Edward J. Stern, Canary Capital Partners, LLC,
Canary Investment Management, LLC, Canary Capital Partners, Ltd,
each of the Funds, and John Does 1-100.

The Funds, and the symbols for the respective Funds named below,
are as follows:


     (1) Nations Capital Growth Fund (Sym: NCGIX, NCGNX, NCAGX,
         NCGRX)

     (2) Nations Marisco 21st Century Fund (Sym: NMTAX, NMTBX,
         NMYCX, NMYAX)

     (3) Nations Marsico Focused Equities Fund (Sym: NFEAX,
         NFEBX, NFECX, NFEPX)

     (4) Nations Marsico Growth Fund (Sym: NMGIX, NGIBX, NMICX,
         NGIPX)

     (5) Nations MidCap Growth Fund (Sym: NEGAX, NEGNX, NEMGX,
         NEGRX)

     (6) Nations Small Company Fund (Sym: NSCGX, NCPBX, NCPCX,
         PSCPX)

     (7) Nations Strategic Growth Fund (Sym: NSGAX, NSIBX, NSGCX
         NSEPX)

     (8) Nations Asset Allocation Fund (Sym: PHAAX, NBASX,
         NAACX, NPRAX)

     (9) Nations MidCap Value Fund (Sym: NAMAX)

    (10) Nations SmallCap Value Fund (Sym: NSVAX)

    (11) Nations Value Fund (Sym: NVLEX, NVLNX, NVALX, NVLUX)

    (12) Nations Global Value Fund (Sym: NVVAX, NGLBX, NCGLX,
         NVPAX)

    (13) Nations International Equity Fund (Sym: NIIAX, NIENX,
         NITRX, NIEQX)

    (14) Nations International Value Fund (Sym: NIVLX, NBIVX,
         NVICX, EMIEX)

    (15) Nations Marsico International Opportunities Fund (Sym:
         MAIOX, MBIOX, MCIOX, NMOAX)

    (16) Nations LargeCap Enhanced Core Fund (Sym: NMIAX, NMIMX)

    (17) Nations LargeCap Index Fund (Sym: NEIAX, NINDX)

    (18) Nations MidCap Index Fund (Sym: NTIAX, NMPAX)

    (19) Nations SmallCap Index Fund (Sym: NMSAX, NMSCX)

    (20) Nations LifeGoal(R) Balanced Growth Portfolio (Sym:
         NBIAX, NLBBX, NBICX, NBGPX)

    (21) Nations LifeGoal(R) Growth Portfolio (Sym: NLGIX,
         NLGBX, NLGCX, NGPAX)

    (22) Nations LifeGoal(R) Income and Growth Portfolio (Sym:
         NLGAX, NLIBX, NIICX, NIPAX)

    (23) Nations Bond Fund (Sym: NSFAX, NSFNX, NSFCX, NSFIX)

    (24) Nations Government Securities Fund (Sym: NGVAX, NGVTX,
         NGVSX, NGOVX)

    (25) Nations High Yield Bond Fund (Sym: NAHAX, NHYBX,
         NYICX, NYPAX)

    (26) Nations Intermediate Bond Fund (Sym: PHBAX, NTBBX,
         NTBCX, NATAX)

    (27) Nations Short-Intermediate Government Fund (Sym: NSIGX,
         NSINX, NSIFX, NSIMX)

    (28) Nations Short-Term Income Fund (Sym: NSTRX, NSTIX,
         NSTMX)

    (29) Nations Strategic Income Fund (Sym: NDIAX, NDVIX,
         NDVSX, NDIVX)

    (30) Nations Convertible Securities Fund (Sym: PACIX, NCVBX,
         PHIKX, NCIAX)

    (31) Nations CA Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NACMX, NCMAX)

    (32) Nations CA Municipal Bond Fund (Sym: PHCTX, NCMBX,
         NCBCX, NCPAX)

    (33) Nations FL Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NFIMX, NFITX, NFINX, NFLBX)

    (34) Nations FL Municipal Bond Fund (Sym: NFDAX, NFMNX,
         NFMBX, NFLMX)

    (35) Nations GA Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NGMIX, NGITX, NGINX, NGAMX)

    (36) Nations Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym: NITMX,
         NIMMX, NIMNX, NINMX)

    (37) Nations Kansas Municipal Income Fund (Sym: NKIAX,
         NKIBX, NKICX, NKSAX)

    (38) Nations MD Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NMDMX, NMITX, NMINX, NMDBX)

    (39) Nations Municipal Income Fund, (Sym: NMUIX, NMNNX,
         NMNIX, NNUNX)

    (40) Nations NC Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NNCIX, NNITX, NNINX, NNIBX)

    (41) Nations SC Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NSCIX, NISCX, NSICX, NSCMX)

    (42) Nations Short-Term Municipal Income Fund (Sym: NSMMX,
         NSMUX, NSMIX)

    (43) Nations TN Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NTIMX, NTNNX, NTINX, NTNIX)

    (44) Nations TX Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NTITX, NTXTX, NTXCX, NTXIX)

    (45) Nations VA Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NVAFX, NVANX, NVRCX, NVABX)

    (46) Nations CA Tax-Exempt Reserves (Sym: NATXX)

    (47) Nations Cash Reserves (Sym: NPRXX, NIBXX, NRSXX)

    (48) Nations Government Reserves (Sym: NGAXX, NGOXX)

    (49) Nations Money Market Reserves (Sym: NRBXX, NRTXX)

    (50) Nations Municipal Reserves (Sym: NMSXX)

    (51) Nations Tax-Exempt Reserves (Sym: NTEXX, NTXXX)

    (52) Nations Treasury Reserves (Sym: NTSXX, NTTXX).

The Complaint alleges that defendants violated Sections 11 and
15 of the Securities Act of 1933; Sections 10(b) and 20(a) of
the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and Rule 10b-5 promulgated
thereunder; and Section 206 of the Investment Advisers Act of
1940.

The Complaint charges that, throughout the Class Period,
defendants failed to disclose that they improperly allowed
certain hedge funds, such as Canary, to engage in the ``timing''
of their transactions in the Funds' securities.  Timing is
excessive, arbitrage trading undertaken to turn a quick profit.
Timing injures ordinary mutual fund investors -- who are not
allowed to engage in such practices -- and is acknowledged as an
improper practice by the Funds.

In return for receiving extra fees from Canary and other favored
investors, Bank of America and its subsidiaries allowed and
facilitated Canary's timing activities, to the detriment of
class members, who paid, dollar for dollar, for Canary's
improper profits.  These practices were undisclosed in the
prospectuses of the Funds, which falsely represented that the
Funds actively police against timing.

For more details, contact Eric J. Belfi or Gregory Linkh by
Phone: (800) 497-8076 or (212) 682-1818 by Fax: (212) 682-1892
or by E-mail: email@rabinlaw.com


BANK OF AMERICA: Emerson Poynter Commences Securities Suit in CA
----------------------------------------------------------------
Emerson Poynter LLP initiated a securities class action in
United States District Court for the Northern District of
California, case number 03-CV-6957, on behalf of all persons or
entities who purchased or otherwise acquired Nations Capital
Growth Fund (Nasdaq:NCGNX) (Nasdaq:NCAGX) (Nasdaq:NCGRX),
Nations Marisco 21st Century Fund (Nasdaq:NMTBX) (Nasdaq:NMYCX)
(Nasdaq:NMYAX), Nations Marisco Focused Equities Fund
(Nasdaq:NFEBX) (Nasdaq:NFECX) (Nasdaq:NFEPX), and the Nations
Funds family of funds owned and operated by Bank of America
Corporation (NYSE:BAC), and its subsidiaries and affiliates,
between October 1, 1998 and July 3, 2003, inclusive.

The complaint names Bank of America Corporation, Banc of America
Capital Management, LLC., Bank of America Advisors, LLC, Nations
Funds Inc., Robert H. Gordon, Theodore H. Sihpol III., Charles
D. Bryceland, Edward J. Stern, Canary Capital Partners, LLC,
Canary Investment Management, LLC, Canary Capital Partners, Ltd,
each of the Funds, and John Does 1-100.

The Complaint alleges that defendants violated Sections 11 and
15 of the Securities Act of 1933; Sections 10(b) and 20(a) of
the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and Rule 10b-5 promulgated
thereunder; and Section 206 of the Investment Advisers Act of
1940.

The Complaint charges that, throughout the Class Period,
defendants failed to disclose that they improperly allowed
certain hedge funds, such as Canary, to engage in the ``timing''
of their transactions in the Funds' securities.  Timing is
excessive, arbitrage trading undertaken to turn a quick profit.
Timing injures ordinary mutual fund investors -- who are not
allowed to engage in such practices -- and is acknowledged as an
improper practice by the Funds.  In return for receiving extra
fees from Canary and other favored investors, Bank of America
and its subsidiaries allowed and facilitated Canary's timing
activities, to the detriment of class members, who paid, dollar
for dollar, for Canary's improper profits.  These practices were
undisclosed in the prospectuses of the Funds, which falsely
represented that the Funds actively police against timing.

The Funds, and the symbols for the respective Funds named below,
are as follows:

     (1) Nations Capital Growth Fund (Sym: NCGIX, NCGNX, NCAGX,
         NCGRX)

     (2) Nations Marisco 21st Century Fund (Sym: NMTAX, NMTBX,
         NMYCX, NMYAX)

     (3) Nations Marsico Focused Equities Fund (Sym: NFEAX,
         NFEBX, NFECX, NFEPX)

     (4) Nations Marsico Growth Fund (Sym: NMGIX, NGIBX, NMICX,
         NGIPX)

     (5) Nations MidCap Growth Fund (Sym: NEGAX, NEGNX, NEMGX,
         NEGRX)

     (6) Nations Small Company Fund (Sym: NSCGX, NCPBX, NCPCX,
         PSCPX)

     (7) Nations Strategic Growth Fund (Sym: NSGAX, NSIBX, NSGCX
         NSEPX)

     (8) Nations Asset Allocation Fund (Sym: PHAAX, NBASX,
         NAACX, NPRAX)

     (9) Nations MidCap Value Fund (Sym: NAMAX)

    (10) Nations SmallCap Value Fund (Sym: NSVAX)

    (11) Nations Value Fund (Sym: NVLEX, NVLNX, NVALX, NVLUX)

    (12) Nations Global Value Fund (Sym: NVVAX, NGLBX, NCGLX,
         NVPAX)

    (13) Nations International Equity Fund (Sym: NIIAX, NIENX,
         NITRX, NIEQX)

    (14) Nations International Value Fund (Sym: NIVLX, NBIVX,
         NVICX, EMIEX)

    (15) Nations Marsico International Opportunities Fund (Sym:
         MAIOX, MBIOX, MCIOX, NMOAX)

    (16) Nations LargeCap Enhanced Core Fund (Sym: NMIAX, NMIMX)

    (17) Nations LargeCap Index Fund (Sym: NEIAX, NINDX)

    (18) Nations MidCap Index Fund (Sym: NTIAX, NMPAX)

    (19) Nations SmallCap Index Fund (Sym: NMSAX, NMSCX)

    (20) Nations LifeGoal(R) Balanced Growth Portfolio (Sym:
         NBIAX, NLBBX, NBICX, NBGPX)

    (21) Nations LifeGoal(R) Growth Portfolio (Sym: NLGIX,
         NLGBX, NLGCX, NGPAX)

    (22) Nations LifeGoal(R) Income and Growth Portfolio (Sym:
         NLGAX, NLIBX, NIICX, NIPAX)

    (23) Nations Bond Fund (Sym: NSFAX, NSFNX, NSFCX, NSFIX)

    (24) Nations Government Securities Fund (Sym: NGVAX, NGVTX,
         NGVSX, NGOVX)

    (25) Nations High Yield Bond Fund (Sym: NAHAX, NHYBX,
         NYICX, NYPAX)

    (26) Nations Intermediate Bond Fund (Sym: PHBAX, NTBBX,
         NTBCX, NATAX)

    (27) Nations Short-Intermediate Government Fund (Sym: NSIGX,
         NSINX, NSIFX, NSIMX)

    (28) Nations Short-Term Income Fund (Sym: NSTRX, NSTIX,
         NSTMX)

    (29) Nations Strategic Income Fund (Sym: NDIAX, NDVIX,
         NDVSX, NDIVX)

    (30) Nations Convertible Securities Fund (Sym: PACIX, NCVBX,
         PHIKX, NCIAX)

    (31) Nations CA Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NACMX, NCMAX)

    (32) Nations CA Municipal Bond Fund (Sym: PHCTX, NCMBX,
         NCBCX, NCPAX)

    (33) Nations FL Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NFIMX, NFITX, NFINX, NFLBX)

    (34) Nations FL Municipal Bond Fund (Sym: NFDAX, NFMNX,
         NFMBX, NFLMX)

    (35) Nations GA Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NGMIX, NGITX, NGINX, NGAMX)

    (36) Nations Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym: NITMX,
         NIMMX, NIMNX, NINMX)

    (37) Nations Kansas Municipal Income Fund (Sym: NKIAX,
         NKIBX, NKICX, NKSAX)

    (38) Nations MD Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NMDMX, NMITX, NMINX, NMDBX)

    (39) Nations Municipal Income Fund, (Sym: NMUIX, NMNNX,
         NMNIX, NNUNX)

    (40) Nations NC Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NNCIX, NNITX, NNINX, NNIBX)

    (41) Nations SC Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NSCIX, NISCX, NSICX, NSCMX)

    (42) Nations Short-Term Municipal Income Fund (Sym: NSMMX,
         NSMUX, NSMIX)

    (43) Nations TN Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NTIMX, NTNNX, NTINX, NTNIX)

    (44) Nations TX Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NTITX, NTXTX, NTXCX, NTXIX)

    (45) Nations VA Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NVAFX, NVANX, NVRCX, NVABX)

    (46) Nations CA Tax-Exempt Reserves (Sym: NATXX)

    (47) Nations Cash Reserves (Sym: NPRXX, NIBXX, NRSXX)

    (48) Nations Government Reserves (Sym: NGAXX, NGOXX)

    (49) Nations Money Market Reserves (Sym: NRBXX, NRTXX)

    (50) Nations Municipal Reserves (Sym: NMSXX)

    (51) Nations Tax-Exempt Reserves (Sym: NTEXX, NTXXX)

    (52) Nations Treasury Reserves (Sym: NTSXX, NTTXX).

For more details, contact John G. Emerson or Scott E. Poynter by
Phone: (800) 497-8076 or (281) 488-8854, by Fax: (281) 488-8867,
or by E-mail: shareholder@emersonfirm.com.


BANK OF AMERICA: Schiffrin & Barroway Lodges NJ Securities Suit
---------------------------------------------------------------
Schiffrin & Barroway, LLP initiated a securities class action in
the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey
on behalf of all purchasers, redeemers and holders of shares of
the Nations Institutional Reserves Convertible Securities Fund
(Nasdaq: PACIX, NCVBX, PHIKX, NCIAX), Nations International
Equity Fund (Nasdaq: NIIAX, NIENX, NITRX, NIEQX), Nations
Emerging Markets Fund (Nasdaq: NEMIX), Nations Fund Inc. Small
Company Fund (Nasdaq: PSCPX) and other funds managed by wholly-
owned subsidiaries of Bank of America (NYSE: BAC; collectively,
the "Nations Funds") between October 1, 1998 and July 3, 2003,
inclusive.

In addition to the funds listed above, the following funds are
subject to the above class action lawsuit:


     (1) Nations Capital Growth Fund (Sym: NCGIX, NCGNX, NCAGX,
         NCGRX)

     (2) Nations Marisco 21st Century Fund (Sym: NMTAX, NMTBX,
         NMYCX, NMYAX)

     (3) Nations Marsico Focused Equities Fund (Sym: NFEAX,
         NFEBX, NFECX, NFEPX)

     (4) Nations Marsico Growth Fund (Sym: NMGIX, NGIBX, NMICX,
         NGIPX)

     (5) Nations MidCap Growth Fund (Sym: NEGAX, NEGNX, NEMGX,
         NEGRX)

     (6) Nations Small Company Fund (Sym: NSCGX, NCPBX, NCPCX,
         PSCPX)

     (7) Nations Strategic Growth Fund (Sym: NSGAX, NSIBX, NSGCX
         NSEPX)

     (8) Nations Asset Allocation Fund (Sym: PHAAX, NBASX,
         NAACX, NPRAX)

     (9) Nations MidCap Value Fund (Sym: NAMAX)

    (10) Nations SmallCap Value Fund (Sym: NSVAX)

    (11) Nations Value Fund (Sym: NVLEX, NVLNX, NVALX, NVLUX)

    (12) Nations Global Value Fund (Sym: NVVAX, NGLBX, NCGLX,
         NVPAX)

    (13) Nations International Equity Fund (Sym: NIIAX, NIENX,
         NITRX, NIEQX)

    (14) Nations International Value Fund (Sym: NIVLX, NBIVX,
         NVICX, EMIEX)

    (15) Nations Marsico International Opportunities Fund (Sym:
         MAIOX, MBIOX, MCIOX, NMOAX)

    (16) Nations LargeCap Enhanced Core Fund (Sym: NMIAX, NMIMX)

    (17) Nations LargeCap Index Fund (Sym: NEIAX, NINDX)

    (18) Nations MidCap Index Fund (Sym: NTIAX, NMPAX)

    (19) Nations SmallCap Index Fund (Sym: NMSAX, NMSCX)

    (20) Nations LifeGoal(R) Balanced Growth Portfolio (Sym:
         NBIAX, NLBBX, NBICX, NBGPX)

    (21) Nations LifeGoal(R) Growth Portfolio (Sym: NLGIX,
         NLGBX, NLGCX, NGPAX)

    (22) Nations LifeGoal(R) Income and Growth Portfolio (Sym:
         NLGAX, NLIBX, NIICX, NIPAX)

    (23) Nations Bond Fund (Sym: NSFAX, NSFNX, NSFCX, NSFIX)

    (24) Nations Government Securities Fund (Sym: NGVAX, NGVTX,
         NGVSX, NGOVX)

    (25) Nations High Yield Bond Fund (Sym: NAHAX, NHYBX,
         NYICX, NYPAX)

    (26) Nations Intermediate Bond Fund (Sym: PHBAX, NTBBX,
         NTBCX, NATAX)

    (27) Nations Short-Intermediate Government Fund (Sym: NSIGX,
         NSINX, NSIFX, NSIMX)

    (28) Nations Short-Term Income Fund (Sym: NSTRX, NSTIX,
         NSTMX)

    (29) Nations Strategic Income Fund (Sym: NDIAX, NDVIX,
         NDVSX, NDIVX)

    (30) Nations Convertible Securities Fund (Sym: PACIX, NCVBX,
         PHIKX, NCIAX)

    (31) Nations CA Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NACMX, NCMAX)

    (32) Nations CA Municipal Bond Fund (Sym: PHCTX, NCMBX,
         NCBCX, NCPAX)

    (33) Nations FL Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NFIMX, NFITX, NFINX, NFLBX)

    (34) Nations FL Municipal Bond Fund (Sym: NFDAX, NFMNX,
         NFMBX, NFLMX)

    (35) Nations GA Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NGMIX, NGITX, NGINX, NGAMX)

    (36) Nations Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym: NITMX,
         NIMMX, NIMNX, NINMX)

    (37) Nations Kansas Municipal Income Fund (Sym: NKIAX,
         NKIBX, NKICX, NKSAX)

    (38) Nations MD Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NMDMX, NMITX, NMINX, NMDBX)

    (39) Nations Municipal Income Fund, (Sym: NMUIX, NMNNX,
         NMNIX, NNUNX)

    (40) Nations NC Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NNCIX, NNITX, NNINX, NNIBX)

    (41) Nations SC Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NSCIX, NISCX, NSICX, NSCMX)

    (42) Nations Short-Term Municipal Income Fund (Sym: NSMMX,
         NSMUX, NSMIX)

    (43) Nations TN Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NTIMX, NTNNX, NTINX, NTNIX)

    (44) Nations TX Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NTITX, NTXTX, NTXCX, NTXIX)

    (45) Nations VA Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (Sym:
         NVAFX, NVANX, NVRCX, NVABX)

    (46) Nations CA Tax-Exempt Reserves (Sym: NATXX)

    (47) Nations Cash Reserves (Sym: NPRXX, NIBXX, NRSXX)

    (48) Nations Government Reserves (Sym: NGAXX, NGOXX)

    (49) Nations Money Market Reserves (Sym: NRBXX, NRTXX)

    (50) Nations Municipal Reserves (Sym: NMSXX)

    (51) Nations Tax-Exempt Reserves (Sym: NTEXX, NTXXX)

    (52) Nations Treasury Reserves (Sym: NTSXX, NTTXX).

The complaint charges the Nations Funds, Bank of America and
certain of its wholly-owned subsidiaries with violations of the
Investment Company Act of 1940 and common law breach of
fiduciary duties in return for substantial fees and other income
for themselves and their affiliates.

The Complaint alleges that during the Class Period, the Nations
Funds and the other defendants engaged in illegal and improper
trading practices, in concert with certain institutional
traders, which caused financial injury to the shareholders of
the Nations Funds.

According to the Complaint, the Defendants surreptitiously
permitted certain favored investors, including Defendant Canary
Capital Partners, LLC and Canary Investment Management, LLC
(collectively, "Canary") to illegally receive the prior day's
price for orders placed after 4 p.m.  This allowed Canary and
other mutual fund investors who engaged in the same wrongful
course of conduct to capitalize on post 4:00 p.m. information,
while those who bought their mutual fund shares lawfully could
not.

The complaint further alleges that defendants permitted Canary
and other favored investors to engage in "timing" of the Nations
Funds whereby these favored investors were permitted to conduct
short-term, "in and out" trading of mutual fund shares, despite
explicit restrictions on such activity in the Nations Funds'
prospectuses.

For more details, contact Marc A. Topaz or Stuart L. Berman by
Mail: Three Bala Plaza East, Suite 400, Bala Cynwyd, PA 19004 by
Phone: 1-888-299-7706 (toll free) or 1-610-667-7706 or by e-
mail: info@sbclasslaw.com


HEALTHTRONICS SURGICAL: Brodsky & Smith Lodges Stock Suit in GA
---------------------------------------------------------------
Brodsky & Smith, LLC initiated a securities class action on
behalf of shareholders who purchased the common stock and other
securities of HealthTronics Surgical Services, Inc.
(NasdaqNM:HTRN), between January 4, 2000 and July 25, 2003
inclusive.  The class action lawsuit was filed against the
Company and certain of its officers and directors in the United
States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia.

The Complaint alleges that defendants violated federal
securities laws by issuing a series of material
misrepresentations to the market during the Class Period,
thereby artificially inflating the price of HealthTronics
securities.  The Complaint further alleges, among other claims,
that HealthTronics made material misrepresentations concerning
the effectiveness of OssaTron(r), HealthTronics leading product
for the treatment of heel pain.

For more details, contact Marc L. Ackerman or Evan J. Smith by
Mail: Two Bala Plaza, Suite 602, Bala Cynwyd, PA 19004, by
Phone: 877-LEGAL-90 or by E-mail: clients@brodsky-smith.com.


MIDWAY GAMES: Cauley Geller Lodges Securities Lawsuit in N.D. IL
----------------------------------------------------------------
Cauley Geller Bowman & Rudman, LLP initiated a securities class
action in the United States District Court for the Northern
District of Illinois on behalf of purchasers of Midway Games,
Inc. (NYSE: MWY) publicly traded securities during the period
between December 11, 2001 and July 30, 2003, inclusive.

The complaint alleges that defendants violated Sections 10(b)
and 20(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and Rule 10b-5
promulgated thereunder, by issuing a series of material
misrepresentations to the market between December 11, 2001 and
July 30, 2003, thereby artificially inflating the price of
Midway's common stock.

The complaint alleges the statements were materially false and
misleading because they failed to disclose and misrepresented
the following material adverse facts which were known to
defendants or recklessly disregarded by them:

     (1) that the Company was experiencing material disruptions
         in its internal studios such that it would be unable to
         meet the expected release dates for its major new game
         titles;

     (2) that the Company's inability to develop new game titles
         in a timely manner was negatively impacting its ability
         to increase revenues and earnings;

     (3) that the Company was experiencing decreased consumer
         demand for its released products; and

     (4) as a result of the foregoing, defendants lacked a
         reasonable basis for their earnings projections for the
         Company, which were therefore materially false and
         misleading.

The Class Period begins on December 11, 2001, when Midway filed
with the SEC, on Form S-3/A, a registration statement containing
alleged misrepresentations with respect to the Company's
offering of 4.5 million shares of common stock.  The truth began
to emerge on July 29, 2003, when the Company announced its
results for the third quarter ended March 31, 2003.

To the shock of the investment community, Midway disclosed that
it generated a mere $5 million, failing to meet its guidance
estimates of $7-11 million.  The revenue decline was attributed
to the delay in the release of a number of titles and decreasing
consumer demand for its released titles.  The Company also
announced that David F. Zucker succeeded Neil D. Nicastro as
chief executive officer and president of Midway Games, Inc.

Midway's July 29, 2003 announcement shocked the markets, causing
the Company's already depressed shares to slide downwards more
than 28%, or $0.97 a share, to close at $2.42 per share on July
30, 2003.

For more details, contact Samuel H. Rudman, David A. Rosenfeld,
Jackie Addison or Heather Gann by Mail: P.O. Box 25438, Little
Rock, AR 72221-5438 by Phone: 1-888-551-9944 by Fax:
1-501-312-8505 or by E-mail: info@cauleygeller.com


MIDWAY GAMES: Schiffrin & Barroway Lodges Stock Suit in N.D. IL
---------------------------------------------------------------
Schiffrin & Barroway, LLP initiated a securities class action in
the United States District Court for the Northern District of
Illinois on behalf of all purchasers of the common stock of
Midway Games, Inc. (NYSE: MWY) from December 11, 2001 through
July 30, 2003, inclusive.

The complaint alleges that defendants violated Sections 10(b)
and 20(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and Rule 10b-5
promulgated thereunder, by issuing a series of material
misrepresentations to the market between December 11, 2001 and
July 30, 2003, thereby artificially inflating the price of
Midway's common stock.

The complaint alleges the statements were materially false and
misleading because they failed to disclose and misrepresented
the following material adverse facts which were known to
defendants or recklessly disregarded by them:

     (1) that the Company was experiencing material disruptions
         in its internal studios such that it would be unable to
         meet the expected release dates for its major new game
         titles;

     (2) that the Company's inability to develop new game titles
         in a timely manner was negatively impacting its ability
         to increase revenues and earnings;

     (3) that the Company was experiencing decreased consumer
         demand for its released products; and

     (4) as a result of the foregoing, defendants lacked a
         reasonable basis for their earnings projections for the
         Company, which were therefore materially false and
         misleading.

The Class Period begins on December 11, 2001, when Midway filed
with the SEC, on Form S-3/A, a registration statement containing
alleged misrepresentations with respect to the Company's
offering of 4.5 million shares of common stock.  The truth began
to emerge on July 29, 2003, when the Company announced its
results for the third quarter ended March 31, 2003.

To the shock of the investment community, Midway disclosed that
it generated a mere $5 million, failing to meet its guidance
estimates of $7-11 million.  The revenue decline was attributed
to the delay in the release of a number of titles and decreasing
consumer demand for its released titles.  The Company also
announced that David F. Zucker succeeded Neil D. Nicastro as
chief executive officer and president of Midway Games, Inc.

Midway's July 29, 2003 announcement shocked the markets, causing
the Company's already depressed shares to slide downwards more
than 28%, or $0.97 a share, to close at $2.42 per share on July
30, 2003.

For more details, contact Marc A. Topaz or Stuart L. Berman by
Mail: Three Bala Plaza East, Suite 400, Bala Cynwyd, PA 19004 by
Phone: 1-888-299-7706 (toll free) or 1-610-667-7706 or by E-
mail: info@sbclasslaw.com


POLAROID CORPORATION: Brodsky & Smith Lodges Stock Lawsuit in NY
----------------------------------------------------------------
Brodsky & Smith, LLC initiated a securities class action on
behalf of shareholders who purchased the common stock and other
securities of Polaroid Corporation (Other OTC:PRDCQ.PK), between
January 26, 2000 and August 9, 2001, inclusive.  The lawsuit was
filed against certain of the Company's officers and directors,
as well as against the Company's auditor, KPMG, in the United
States District Court for the Southern District of New York.

The Complaint alleges that during the Class Period, the
defendants violated federal securities laws by issuing a series
of material misrepresentations and filing numerous reports with
the SEC that misrepresented the Company's financial condition,
thereby artificially inflating the price of Polaroid securities.
During the same time period, KPMG issued unqualified audit
opinions regarding the Company's financial statements.

For more details, contact Marc L. Ackerman or Evan J. Smith by
Mail: Two Bala Plaza, Suite 602, Bala Cynwyd, PA 19004, by
Phone: 877-LEGAL-90 or by E-mail: clients@brodsky-smith.com.


POLAROID CORPORATION: Shapiro Haber Lodges Securities Suit in MA
----------------------------------------------------------------
Shapiro Haber & Urmy LLP initiated a securities class action in
the United States District Court for the District of
Massachusetts on behalf of all persons who purchased the common
stock of Polaroid Corporation (Other OTC:PRDCQ.PK) between
January 26, 2000 and August 16, 2001, inclusive.

The plaintiff in the action is Stephen J. Morgan, a substantial
Polaroid shareholder who has been active in working for
shareholder interests in the Polaroid bankruptcy proceeding now
pending in the United States Bankruptcy Court in Delaware.  The
defendants in the case are:

     (1) KPMG LLP, auditors during the class period,

     (2) Gary T. DiCamillo, Chairman and CEO,

     (3) Carl L. Lueders,

     (4) Judith G. Boynton,

     (5) William K. Flaherty, Chief Financial Officer, and

     (6) Donald M. Halsted, former Vice President and
         Controller

The complaint alleges that the defendants violated sections
10(b) and 20(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 by making
numerous materially false and misleading statements during the
class period, including statements in quarterly and annual
reports filed with the SEC.  The complaint alleges that, as
appears from a recent Report issued by an Examiner appointed by
the Bankruptcy Court, all the defendants knew or should have
known that Polaroid's financial condition was materially worse
than the defendants represented to the investing public.

The complaint also alleges that by issuing unqualified audit
opinions regarding Polaroid's financial statements and financial
condition during the class period and by failing to issue a
"going concern" qualification, KPMG violated the Federal
securities laws.  The suit alleges that as the result of the
defendants' statements, the price of Polaroid's common stock was
artificially inflated during the class period.

For more details, contact Thomas V. Urmy, Jr., Thomas G.
Shapiro, or Alyssa Petroff by Mail: 75 State Street, Boston,
Massachusetts 02109, by Phone: 800-287-8119 by Fax: 617-439-0134
by E-mail: cases@shulaw.com or visit the firm's Website:
http://www.shulaw.com


POLAROID CORPORATION: Rabin Murray Lodges Securities Suit in NY
---------------------------------------------------------------
Rabin Murray & Frank LLP initiated a securities class action in
the United States District Court for the Southern District of
New York, case number 03 Civ. 7499, on behalf of all persons or
entities who purchased Polaroid Corporation securities (OTC
BB:PRDCQ.OB) during the period between January 26, 2000 and
August 9, 2001, both dates inclusive.  The suit names as
defendants:

     (1) KPMG LLP,

     (2) Gary T. DiCamillo,

     (3) Carl L. Lueders,

     (4) Donald M. Halsted,

     (5) William L. Flaherty, and

     (6) Judith G. Boynton

The complaint alleges that defendants violated section 10(b) of
the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Rule 10b-5 promulgated
thereunder by the Securities and Exchange Commission.  In
particular, the complaint alleges that Polaroid's financial
statements during the class period were materially false and
misleading for the following reasons:

     (i) the improper inclusion of the deferred tax credits
         asset which had little or no future value;

    (ii) the improper reversal of restructuring reserves in the
         fourth quarter of 2000; and

   (iii) the improper classification of short-term debt as long-
         term debt.

Additionally, the complaint alleges that defendant KMPG's
unqualified audit opinions and quarterly reviews were false and
misleading because the Company's financial statements were not
prepared in accordance with GAAP or audited in accordance with
GAAS.

For more details, contact Eric J. Belfi or Gregory Linkh by
Phone: (800) 497-8076 or (212) 682-1818 by Fax: (212) 682-1892
or by E-mail: email@rabinlaw.com


STRONG FINANCIAL: Emerson Poynter Lodges Securities Suit in NY
--------------------------------------------------------------
Emerson Poynter LLP initiated a securities class action in
United States District Court for the Southern District of New
York, case number 03-CV-7438, on behalf of all persons or
entities who purchased or otherwise acquired Strong Advisor
Common Stock Fund (Nasdaq:SCSKX, STSAX, STCSX), Strong Advisor
Small Cap Value Fund (Nasdaq:SMVBX, SMVCX, SSMVX) and other
Strong Funds owned and operated by Strong Financial Corporation,
and its subsidiaries and affiliates, between October 1, 1998 and
July 3, 2003, inclusive.

The complaint names Strong Financial Corporation, Strong Capital
Management, Inc., and each of the Funds' registrants and
issuers, Edward J. Stern, Canary Capital Partners, LLC, Canary
Investment Management, LLC, Canary Capital Partners, Ltd, each
of the Funds, and John Does 1-100.

The Complaint alleges that defendants violated Sections 11 and
15 of the Securities Act of 1933; Sections 10(b) and 20(a) of
the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and Rule 10b-5 promulgated
thereunder; and Section 206 of the Investment Advisers Act of
1940.

The Complaint charges that, throughout the Class Period,
defendants failed to disclose that they improperly allowed
certain hedge funds, such as Canary, to engage in the ``timing''
of their transactions in the Funds' securities.  Timing is
excessive, arbitrage trading undertaken to turn a quick profit.
Timing injures ordinary mutual fund investors -- who are not
allowed to engage in such practices -- and is acknowledged as an
improper practice by the Funds.

In return for receiving extra fees from Canary and other favored
investors, Strong Financial Corporation and its subsidiaries
allowed and facilitated Canary's timing activities, to the
detriment of class members, who paid, dollar for dollar, for
Canary's improper profits.  These practices were undisclosed in
the prospectuses of the Funds, which falsely represented that
the Funds actively police against timing.

The Funds, and the symbols for the respective Funds named below,
are as follows:

     (1) Strong Advisor Bond Fund (SVBDX, SADBX, SABCX, SIBNX,
         F008W1, SBDIX)

     (2) Strong Advisor Municipal Bond Fund (SAMAX, SMBBX,
         F00BH8)

     (3) Strong Advisor Municipal Select Fund (SMUIX, STAEX,
         F005LZ, F005M9)

     (4) Strong Advisor Short Duration Bond A Fund (STSDX,
         SSDKX, SSHCX, STGBX)

     (5) Strong Advisor Common Stock Fund (SCSAX, SCSKX, STSAX,
         STCSX)

     (6) Strong Advisor Endeavor Large Cap Fund (STALX, F008GO)

     (7) Strong Advisor Focus Fund (F005MO, F005M7, F005LT)

     (8) Strong Advisor International Core Fund (F008GQ, F008GR,
         F008GS)

     (9) Strong Advisor Large Company Core Fund (SLGAX, F00AO2,
         F00AO3, SLCKX)

    (10) Strong Advisor Mid-Cap Growth Fund (F005LQ, F005M1,
         F005LO, SMDCX)

    (11) Strong Advisor Small Cap Value Fund (SMVAX, SMVBX,
         SMVCX, SSMVX)

    (12) Strong Advisor Strategic Income Fund (SASAX, F005L7,
         SASCX)

    (13) Strong Advisor Technology Fund (SASCX, F005LM, F005LM)

    (14) Strong Advisor U.S. Small/Mid Cap Growth Fund (F009D0,
         F009D1)

    (15) Strong Advisor U.S. Value (F005M2, F005M5, F005MA,
         SEQKX, SEQIX)

    (16) Strong Advisor Utilities and Energy Fund (SUEAX,
         F00AED, F00AEE, F009D5)

    (17) Strong All Cap Value Fund (F009D5)

    (18) Strong Asia Pacific Fund (SASPX)

    (19) Strong Balanced Fund (STAAX)

    (20) Strong Blue Chip Fund (SBCHX)

    (21) Strong Discovery Fund (STDIX)

    (22) Strong Dividend Income Fund (SDVIX, F008VY)

    (23) Strong Dow 30 Value Fund (SDOWX)

    (24) Strong Endeavor Fund (SENDX)

    (25) Strong Energy Fund (SENGX)

    (26) Strong Enterprise Fund (SENAX, F04ANX, SENTX, SEPKX)

    (27) Strong Growth & Income Fund (SGNAX, SGNIX, SGRIX,
         SGIKX)

    (28) Strong Growth 20 Fund (SGTWX, SGRTX, SGRAX, F00B67,
         SGRNX)

    (29) Strong Growth Fund (SGROX, SGRKX)

    (30) Strong Index 500 Fund (SINEX)

    (31) Strong Large Cap Core Fund (SLCRX)

    (32) Strong Large Cap Growth Fund (STRFX)

    (33) Strong Large Company Growth Fund (SLGIX, F04ANY)

    (34) Strong Mid Cap Disciplined Fund (SMCDX)

    (35) Strong Multi-Cap Value Fund (SMTVX)

    (36) Strong Opportunity Fund (SOPVX, SOPFX, F00AH2)

    (37) Strong Overseas Fund (F00B4I, SOVRX)

    (38) Strong Small Company Value Fund (F009D3)

    (39) Strong Technology 100 Fund (STEKX)

    (40) Strong U.S. Emerging Growth Fund (SEMRX)

    (41) Strong Value Fund (STVAX)

    (42) Strong Life Stages - Aggressive Portfolio Fund (SAGGX)

    (43) Strong Life Stages - Conservative Portfolio Fund
         (SCONX)

    (44) Strong Life Stages - Moderate Portfolio Fund (SMDPX)

    (45) Strong Corporate Bond Fund (SCBDX, SCBNX, STCBX)

    (46) Strong Corporate Income Fund (SCORX)

    (47) Strong High-Yield Bond Fund (SHBAX, SHYYX, STHYX)

    (48) Strong Government Securities Fund (SGVDX, F00B66,
         SGVIX, STVSX)

    (49) Strong High-Yield Municipal Bond Fund (SHYLX)

    (50) Strong Intermediate Municipal Bond Fund (SIMBX)

    (51) Strong Municipal Bond Fund (SXFIX)

    (52) Strong Minnesota Tax-Free Fund (F00B64, F00B65, F00B63)

    (53) Strong Wisconsin Tax-Free Fund (F0068K)

    (54) Strong Short-Term High-Yield Municipal Bond Fund
         (SSHMX, SSTHX, STHBX)

    (55) Strong Short-Term Municipal Bond Fund (F00B62, STSMX)

    (56) Strong Short-Term Income Fund (F00B1K)

    (57) Strong Short-Term Bond Fund (SSTVX, SSHIX, SSTBX)

    (58) Strong Ultra Short-Term Income Fund (SADAX, SADIX,
         STADX)

    (59) Strong Ultra Short-Term Municipal Income Fund (SMAVX,
         SMAIX, SMUAX)

    (60) Strong Florida Municipal Money Market Fund (SLFXX)

    (61) Strong Heritage Money Fund (SHMXX)

    (62) Strong Money Market Fund (SMNXX)

    (63) Strong Municipal Money Market Fund (SXFXX)

    (64) Strong Tax-Free Money Fund (STMXX)

For more details, contact John G. Emerson or Scott E. Poynter by
Phone: 1 (800) 663-9817 by Fax: (281) 488-8867 or by E-mail:
shareholder@emersonfirm.com


VERTEX PHARMACEUTICALS: Brodsky & Smith Lodges Stock Suit in MA
---------------------------------------------------------------
Brodsky & Smith, LLC initiated a securities class action on
behalf of shareholders who purchased the common stock and other
securities of Vertex Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NasdaqNM:VRTX),
between March 27, 2000 and September 24, 2001 inclusive.  The
lawsuit was filed against the Company and certain of its
officers and directors in the United States District Court for
the District of Massachusetts.

Vertex is a global biotechnology company focused on the
discovery, development and commercialization of breakthrough
drugs for serious diseases.  The complaint alleges that the
defendants violated federal securities laws by issuing a series
of material misrepresentations to the market during the Class
Period, thereby artificially inflating the price of Vertex
securities.

The complaint further alleges, among other claims, that Vertex
concealed critical information regarding the development of a
new drug through its VX-745 program.

For more details, contact Marc L. Ackerman or Evan J. Smith by
Mail: Two Bala Plaza, Suite 602, Bala Cynwyd, PA 19004, by
Phone: 877-LEGAL-90 or by E-mail: clients@brodsky-smith.com

                        *********

A list of Meetings, Conferences and Seminars appears in each
Wednesday's edition of the Class Action Reporter. Submissions
via e-mail to carconf@beard.com are encouraged.

Each Friday's edition of the CAR includes a section featuring
news on asbestos-related litigation and profiles of target
asbestos defendants that, according to independent researches,
collectively face billions of dollars in asbestos-related
liabilities.  The Asbestos Defendant Profiles is backed by an
online database created to respond to custom searches. Go to
http://litigationdatasource.com/asbestos_defendant_profiles.html

                        *********


S U B S C R I P T I O N   I N F O R M A T I O N

Class Action Reporter is a daily newsletter, co-published by
Bankruptcy Creditors' Service, Inc., Trenton, New Jersey, and
Beard Group, Inc., Washington, D.C.  Enid Sterling, Roberto
Amor, Aurora Fatima Antonio and Lyndsey Resnick, Editors.

Copyright 2003.  All rights reserved.  ISSN 1525-2272.

This material is copyrighted and any commercial use, resale or
publication in any form (including e-mail forwarding, electronic
re-mailing and photocopying) is strictly prohibited without
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Information contained herein is obtained from sources believed
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